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« The Uniform Code of Characters | Main | Darn Technology! »

May 29, 2004

Comments

johnmoore (from Brand Autopsy)

Could it be that we marketers use language of war in our marketing strategies to illicit pseudo-emotional feelings from our employees because the underlying mission/cause of the company isn’t compelling enough on its own for its employees to feel inspired by?


Great conversation Katherine ... it has my mind thinking. (Thanks.)

Michele Miller

Being on the fringe, being outsiders, speaking our minds freely - is this not why we are a) in business for ourselves, and b) blogging?

You go, girl - I'm with you all the way.

pete

Amen, Katharine. As the costs of communication go down, it is feasible/cost-effective to have genuine one-on-one relationships and experiences with our customers. That is what we should be striving for.

Johnnie Moore

I just don't understand why Rich's diatribe against political correctness is linked to your entry. So you and those commenting dislike the military analogies in marketing and we say so.

Rich calls this "political correctness". I call it debate. And a welcome one.

fouro

I think I get it now. We're Combat Engineers For Commerce. If we can't win their hearts and minds, we bring in the bulldozers and heavy ordnance.

Johnmoore (fBA)may have the point: If we can't win 'em over, we nuke 'em and start fresh. None's the wiser.

David Wolfe

Katherine, decent marketing is an idea waiting to grow. Take a look at http://my.netscape.com/corewidgets/news/story.psp?cat=51180&id=2004060215020001004470 -- or just read my violation of copyright law below:

Girls Pushing for Modest Fashion Options

REDMOND, Wash. (AP) - During a recent shopping trip to
Nordstrom, 11-year-old Ella Gunderson became frustrated with all
the low-cut hip-huggers and skintight tops. So she wrote to the
Seattle-based chain's executives to complain. The industry has been
getting the message: A more modest look is in, fashion experts say.
The shy, bespectacled redhead has since become an instant media
darling, appearing on national television over the past two weeks
to promote modest fashions instead of the saucy looks popularized
by the likes of Britney Spears.
``We like to call this new girl Miss Modesty,'' said Gigi Solif
Schanen, fashion editor at Seventeen magazine. ``It's such a
different feeling but still very pretty and feminine and sexy. It's
just a little more covered up.''
Shoppers are starting to see higher waistlines and lower
hemlines, and tweeds, fitted blazers and layers are expected to be
big this fall, Schanen said.
``It's kind of like a sexy take on a librarian,'' she said. ``I
think people are tired of seeing so much skin and want to leave a
little more to the imagination.''
The Web sites ModestApparelUSA.com and ModestByDesign.com -
where the slogan is ``Clothing your father would be proud of'' -
report that sales have skyrocketed over the past 18 months.
Many youngsters are frustrated by the profusion of racy teenage
clothing, according to Buzz Marketing, a New Jersey-based firm that
compiles feedback from teen advisers.
``There is just sensory overload. Kids are going to say enough
already,'' said Buzz's 24-year-old chief executive, Tina Wells.
``The next big trend I see is kids are going to look like monks.''
In 2002, a group of Arizona teens submitted a petition to the
Phoenix division of the Dillard's department store chain asking for
more modest clothes. The chain began carrying more conservative
styles.
Nordstrom spokeswoman Deniz Anders said the company has been
hearing for about two years from customers who want more modest
looks, and Nordstrom tries to carry a broad array of styles in its
stores.
The arrival of the modest look is good news for Ella, who last
week participated in a sold-out ``Pure Fashion'' show in Bellevue
with 37 other girls belonging to a Roman Catholic youth
organization.
Ella, who paraded down the catwalk in a long-sleeved pink top
and a shiny pink skirt, hopes the fashion show - and her letter -
will prompt some change.
``There can be more than one look,'' the Redmond youngster said
in an interview while wearing a loose Pure Fashion T-shirt, jeans
and hot pink flip-flops. ``Everybody should have lots of choices.''
On the Net:
Wholesome Wear: http://www.wholesomewear.com
ModestApparelUSA: http://www.modestapparelusa.com
Modest By Design: http://www.modestbydesign.com
Nordstrom: http://www.nordstrom.com

We need more decent-minded marketing, and in time, more and consumers are going to demand it -- like 11-year-old Ella Gunderson.

David Wolfe

Katherine, decent marketing is an idea waiting to grow. Take a look at http://my.netscape.com/corewidgets/news/story.psp?cat=51180&id=2004060215020001004470 -- or just read my violation of copyright law below:

Girls Pushing for Modest Fashion Options

REDMOND, Wash. (AP) - During a recent shopping trip to
Nordstrom, 11-year-old Ella Gunderson became frustrated with all
the low-cut hip-huggers and skintight tops. So she wrote to the
Seattle-based chain's executives to complain. The industry has been
getting the message: A more modest look is in, fashion experts say.
The shy, bespectacled redhead has since become an instant media
darling, appearing on national television over the past two weeks
to promote modest fashions instead of the saucy looks popularized
by the likes of Britney Spears.
``We like to call this new girl Miss Modesty,'' said Gigi Solif
Schanen, fashion editor at Seventeen magazine. ``It's such a
different feeling but still very pretty and feminine and sexy. It's
just a little more covered up.''
Shoppers are starting to see higher waistlines and lower
hemlines, and tweeds, fitted blazers and layers are expected to be
big this fall, Schanen said.
``It's kind of like a sexy take on a librarian,'' she said. ``I
think people are tired of seeing so much skin and want to leave a
little more to the imagination.''
The Web sites ModestApparelUSA.com and ModestByDesign.com -
where the slogan is ``Clothing your father would be proud of'' -
report that sales have skyrocketed over the past 18 months.
Many youngsters are frustrated by the profusion of racy teenage
clothing, according to Buzz Marketing, a New Jersey-based firm that
compiles feedback from teen advisers.
``There is just sensory overload. Kids are going to say enough
already,'' said Buzz's 24-year-old chief executive, Tina Wells.
``The next big trend I see is kids are going to look like monks.''
In 2002, a group of Arizona teens submitted a petition to the
Phoenix division of the Dillard's department store chain asking for
more modest clothes. The chain began carrying more conservative
styles.
Nordstrom spokeswoman Deniz Anders said the company has been
hearing for about two years from customers who want more modest
looks, and Nordstrom tries to carry a broad array of styles in its
stores.
The arrival of the modest look is good news for Ella, who last
week participated in a sold-out ``Pure Fashion'' show in Bellevue
with 37 other girls belonging to a Roman Catholic youth
organization.
Ella, who paraded down the catwalk in a long-sleeved pink top
and a shiny pink skirt, hopes the fashion show - and her letter -
will prompt some change.
``There can be more than one look,'' the Redmond youngster said
in an interview while wearing a loose Pure Fashion T-shirt, jeans
and hot pink flip-flops. ``Everybody should have lots of choices.''
On the Net:
Wholesome Wear: http://www.wholesomewear.com
ModestApparelUSA: http://www.modestapparelusa.com
Modest By Design: http://www.modestbydesign.com
Nordstrom: http://www.nordstrom.com

We need more decent-minded marketing, and in time, more and consumers are going to demand it -- like 11-year-old Ella Gunderson.

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